Month: November 2009

Art & Cartography activities at the ICC 2009

The working group (WG) on Art and Cartography was pretty active at the International Cartographic Association Conference in Santiago (Chile) last week. We had our Working group meeting (Attendance: 19 people); a movie screening: A historical review of maps in film edited by Giacomo Andreucci & Virtual globes were born in cinema : A century of envisioning dynamic maps in movies edited by Sébastien Caquard (Attendance: About 100 people); and two paper sessions:  8 papers (Very well attended: up to 110 people). And we were present until the end of the conference as you can see on this picture…

We are looking forward to the next ICC: Paris 2011.

International Cartographic Conference – Nov. 15 – 21, 2009

The ICA “Art & Cartography” working group is organizing a couple of activities at the ICC2009 in Santiago de Chile:

  • A meeting of the working group in order to discuss future ideas, projects, perspectives in the promising field of art & cartography – Wednesday, november 18th: 14-17.30pm in R1 (room);
  • A special movie screening: A selection of scenes dedicated to “Maps in Movies” (wednesday, november 18th at 18:00 through to 19:00, Main Auditorium);
  • Two technical sessions (presentation of paper) (Saturday, November 21st).

Please feel free to distribute this message among friends and colleagues who will also travel to Chile and might be interested in topics concerning “Art & Cartography”.

Ian Hundley. Quilts Made of Maps

Bierbergen Oedelum Black 2006 cotton, wool, silk & linen 80 x 80 inches

Awesome large-scale quilts are made by Ian Hundley, a Brooklyn-based artist, using maps as an inspiration and transforming them into these special patchwork pieces. (More images here). In this video (Cool Hunting, 2006) Ian Hundley discusses his work and inspirations.

Enjoy!

Thanks to Xabi Zirikiain for being so informative!

Map cuts by Karen O’Leary

koleary_papercutsAmerican artist Karen O’Leary reimagines the map as an exchange of negative and positive space. Deftly cutting maps of New York, Paris and London with razor precision, she leaves delicate webs of streets as land and water are cut away. Negative space demarcates land, while meandering grids of paper represents streets.

There is an interview with the artist here.

More information about this work:

http://infosthetics.com/archives/2009/11/hand-cut_maps.html

http://www.coolhunting.com/archives/2009/11/karen_olearys_c.php

 

 

The Map Is Not the Territory Revisited (London)

This group exhibition at the England & Co. gallery is the latest in an occasional series of exhibitions of artists using maps and map-making strategies.

Wallis-Johnson_London USA (detail)

Jason Wallis-Johnson: London USA (detail)

Works by artists including: Chris Kenny, Michael Druks, Georgia Russell, Jason Wallis-Johnson, Grayson Perry, 
Rolf Brandt, Cornelia Parker, Terry Ryan, Abigail Reynolds, Jonathan Callan, Deirdre Jackson, Alberto Duman, Vito Drago, Margaret Proudfoot, Richard Wentworth, Jugoslav Vlahovic, Paul Tecklenberg and Satomi Matoba.

7-28 November. Private View Friday 13 November 6 to 8:30 pm
England & Co. Gallery.
216 Westbourne Grove
London
W11 2RH

Thanks to Tinho da Cruz for posting this information via CARTO-SoC, the Society of Cartographers Mailing List.

Hidden histories of exploration

imgAn exhibition devoted to the role of indigenous peoples in the history of exploration can be seen in London these days. There is also a website containing many images, film clips and research materials from the Royal Geographical Society collections: www.rgs.org/hiddenhistories

15 October – 10 December 2009
Location:
Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Exhibition Road, London

Hidden Histories of Exploration reveals the contribution of people such as Juan Tepano, Mohammed Jen Jamain, Sidi Mubarak Bombay, Nain Singh and Pedro Caripoco to the history of exploration. Find out about their role and its lasting significance, as illustrated in the paintings, books, maps photographs, artefacts and manuscripts of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). Materials from Africa, Asia, the Arctic and the Americas are respresented, with highlights including paintings by Thomas Baines, Catherine Frere’s sketches of women on an African expedition, and film from the 1922 Everest expedition.