Month: April 2010

Seeing The Art In Cartography

BBC4  is broadcasting a series called The Beauty of Maps. They have a web-site where you can have a look at it. I haven’t done that myself yet in deep;  when I try to see the videos a  this -video-is-not-available-in-your-area kind of message pops up (I am trying it from Spain, by the way). Anyway it seems very interesting, as they focus nor only in beautifuly selected Historical Maps, but also in those new ways o depicting the digital world we live in.

Magnificent Maps: Power, Propaganda and Art

Fri 30 Apr 2010 – Sun 19 Sep 2010
PACCAR Gallery, British Library

Magnificent Maps showcases the British Library’s unique collection of large-scale display maps, many of which have never been exhibited before, and demonstrates why maps are about far more than geography.

The exhibition will include large-scale, impressive maps from the 1400s to the present day, including the largest atlas in the world, the Klencke Atlas of 1660. It will suggest the settings in which they might originally have been seen – from the palace to the schoolroom and the home – reveal the themes that unite them, and highlight the sheer artistry that was involved in their production.

Magnificent Maps will also explore the reason behind the construction of these visually arresting works of art. Which range from maps used for indoctrination or expressions of local pride to irrefutable statements of power and illustrations of rulers’ spheres of influence.

The exhibition will be supported by a wide range of events, from talks and discussions to family events.

For more information:
Julie Yau, Arts Press Officer, British Library
+44 [0] 20 7412 7237 / julie.yau@bl.uk

“Carte du tendre” in the Google era

Few centuries after Madame de Scudéry’s famous “Carte du tendre” here is the most recent version of artistic detournement of maps for expressing ideas, emotions, perceptions and even recipes. Artists Christoph Niemann uses the now famous symbology of Google maps to represent multiple forms of journeys: From the humoristic trip of the eggs to the omelet; to the more political representation of the opposite directions taken by both main street and wall street. If the concept is not totally new, its recontextualization in the Google era is definitely original, funny and meaningful.

Thanks to Daniel Naud for pointing us to this project.