Author: teresaiturrioz

Synchronous Objects for “One Flat Thing”…

…reproduced by William Forsythe, is a project about visualizing choreographic  (can I say geographic?) information in new ways. Could choreography and Dance be used to research about Movement, Space and Visualization? Can Cartography and other mapping artifacts be used to help choreographers’ creativity and work?

synchronousobjects

Coproduced by The Forsythe Company with the Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design and the Department of Dance at The Ohio State University. Synchronous Objects reveals the interlocking systems of organization in William Forsythe’s ensemble dance One Flat Thing, reproduced through a series of objects that work in harmony to explore its choreographic structures and reimagine what else they might look like. Here!

Atlases win the 2009 Rotterdam Design Prize

We are happy to know that this year’s Rotterdam Design Prize has gone to the Studio Joost Grootens for their work in different atlases. They do really look good. Congratulations!

Joost Grootens Kan Atlas

Joost Grootens Kan Atlas

At 5.00 p.m. on Sunday 29 November in the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen pavilion, Peter van Ingen, chairman of the international panel of judges, announced the winner of the 2009 Rotterdam Design Prize.
The judges unanimously described Grootens’s work as of the moment and world class. They liked his attitude. ‘Grootens attaches great importance to the clarity of the information. His design is clearly intended to serve the reader. For Grootens, designing is not a self-seeking activity, nor does it mean promulgating a particular vision. The result is at once brilliant and functional.’

Ian Hundley. Quilts Made of Maps

Bierbergen Oedelum Black 2006 cotton, wool, silk & linen 80 x 80 inches

Awesome large-scale quilts are made by Ian Hundley, a Brooklyn-based artist, using maps as an inspiration and transforming them into these special patchwork pieces. (More images here). In this video (Cool Hunting, 2006) Ian Hundley discusses his work and inspirations.

Enjoy!

Thanks to Xabi Zirikiain for being so informative!

Map cuts by Karen O’Leary

koleary_papercutsAmerican artist Karen O’Leary reimagines the map as an exchange of negative and positive space. Deftly cutting maps of New York, Paris and London with razor precision, she leaves delicate webs of streets as land and water are cut away. Negative space demarcates land, while meandering grids of paper represents streets.

There is an interview with the artist here.

More information about this work:

http://infosthetics.com/archives/2009/11/hand-cut_maps.html

http://www.coolhunting.com/archives/2009/11/karen_olearys_c.php

 

 

The Map Is Not the Territory Revisited (London)

This group exhibition at the England & Co. gallery is the latest in an occasional series of exhibitions of artists using maps and map-making strategies.

Wallis-Johnson_London USA (detail)

Jason Wallis-Johnson: London USA (detail)

Works by artists including: Chris Kenny, Michael Druks, Georgia Russell, Jason Wallis-Johnson, Grayson Perry, 
Rolf Brandt, Cornelia Parker, Terry Ryan, Abigail Reynolds, Jonathan Callan, Deirdre Jackson, Alberto Duman, Vito Drago, Margaret Proudfoot, Richard Wentworth, Jugoslav Vlahovic, Paul Tecklenberg and Satomi Matoba.

7-28 November. Private View Friday 13 November 6 to 8:30 pm
England & Co. Gallery.
216 Westbourne Grove
London
W11 2RH

Thanks to Tinho da Cruz for posting this information via CARTO-SoC, the Society of Cartographers Mailing List.

Hidden histories of exploration

imgAn exhibition devoted to the role of indigenous peoples in the history of exploration can be seen in London these days. There is also a website containing many images, film clips and research materials from the Royal Geographical Society collections: www.rgs.org/hiddenhistories

15 October – 10 December 2009
Location:
Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Exhibition Road, London

Hidden Histories of Exploration reveals the contribution of people such as Juan Tepano, Mohammed Jen Jamain, Sidi Mubarak Bombay, Nain Singh and Pedro Caripoco to the history of exploration. Find out about their role and its lasting significance, as illustrated in the paintings, books, maps photographs, artefacts and manuscripts of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). Materials from Africa, Asia, the Arctic and the Americas are respresented, with highlights including paintings by Thomas Baines, Catherine Frere’s sketches of women on an African expedition, and film from the 1922 Everest expedition.