Exhibit

Speed of Light in Manchester (uk)

Posted previously, the fantastic Speed of Light will be illuminating the night(s) in march at this years Future Everything festival:

Quays Culture presents NVA’s Speed of Light at MediaCityUK, an extraordinary public art performance that is set to bring Salford’s waterfront to life from 8pm on 21, 22 and 23 March. A centrepiece of the Edinburgh International Festival and recently staged in the docklands of Yokohama in Japan, the night-time work uses light, intentional movement and sound to change the way we see and feel about a chosen environment. Hundreds of runners in specially commissioned LED light suits will create beautiful, choreographed patterns of light flowing over bridges and around public spaces and buildings that surround Salford Quays. Free and non-ticketed for the watching audience, it can be seen as a piece of abstract art on the grandest scale: monumental but surprisingly quiet and reflective.

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http://futureeverything.org/summit/art/quays-culture-presents-speed-of-light/

Speed of Light

Happy New Year everyone.

 

A mesmerising visual display unfolds each night on the ascent to the summit as hundreds of runners wearing specially designed light suits take to the intricate path networks below. As a member of the walking audience you become part of the work, carrying portable light sources set against the dark features of the hill.

Each individual performance is created by collective action, landscape and weather, offering a rare perspective on the cityscape, night skies and the sea and hills beyond.

speed of lightspeed of light2

http://edinburghfestival.list.co.uk/event/246791-nvas-speed-of-light/

Wastelands to Wonderlands

I recently visited the British Library @britishlibrary in London where they explored literature ‘from William Blake to the 21st-century suburban hinterlands of J G Ballard, Writing Britain examines how the landscapes of Britain permeate great literary works.’

It is an interesting project with over 150 literary works included categorised into:

  1. Rural Dreams
  2. Dark Satanic Mills
  3. Wild Places
  4. Beyond the City
  5. Cockney Visions
  6. Waterlands

What caught my attention was the description of Wild Places,

‘Wild landscapes such as moors and heaths can be overwhelming and unknowable, presenting challenges to the human mind. [...] Encounters with the wild can equally be transformative for writers, enlarging their ordinary limits of perception, and prompting spiritual renewal’

It was enlarging the ordinary limits of perception that intrigued me, is this what neocartography could be, what makes these places enlarge the ordinary limits of perception?

I like to think that it is something along the lines of ‘GeoSensitivities’ that these places are transformed/transcend the ordinary limits through literature or cartography. These sensitivities could be along the lines of what psychogeography explores:

  • human beings walking (not cars)
  • lost found making the unimaginable, imaginable
  • new maps can smell
  • experiential & hidden

These are some of the views that @FelphamPA proposes, is it partly that place of magical realism in literature, these non existent environments (enhancements) that enlarge the ordinary limits of perception?

It could be these devices literature/geosensitivities that could provide the wonder, or as FelphamPA quotes:

“Felpham, in particular, is the sweetest spot on earth.”
William Blake

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/writingbritain/about/

Share your own tales with an interactive map http://www.bl.uk/pin-a-tale/pin-a-tale-map.aspx

You might also like http://www.poetryatlas.com/

Alighiero Boetti: Mappa


Until February 5th, the Museo Reina Sofía of Madrid, exhibits a great collection of works by Alighiero Boetti (1940 – 1994), an Italian conceptual artist, considered to be a member of the art movement Arte Povera. Many of his pieces are maps embroidered by artisans in Afghanistan and Pakistan, as a result of a collaborative process leaving the design to the geopolitical realities of the time, and the choice of colours to the artisans responsible for the embroidery.

From wikipedia: “For me the work of the embroidered Mappa is the maximum of beauty. For that work I did nothing, chose nothing, in the sense that: the world is made as it is, not as I designed it, the flags are those that exist, and I did not design them; in short I did absolutely nothing; when the basic idea, the concept, emerges everything else requires no choosing.” Alighiero e Boetti, 1974

That’s why the sea is painted in red, pink or yellow; while they were doing their work, the artisans didn’t know what meant the area with no-assigned-colour. Although as it has been said by the expert in Boetti with whom I have visited the exhibition, they even didn’t know the meaning of the whole image.

Boetti was a conceptual artist, but his work is also visually rich and joyful. Being a coproduction, after Museo Reina Sofía, the exhibition will travel to the Tate Modern and Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Highly recommended.

http://www.museoreinasofia.es/exposiciones/actuales/boetti_en.html

The Art of Mapping exhibit

London is really the place where maps and artists get along quite well those days, as illustrated by the current exhibit on “The Art of Mapping” at the TAG Fine Art gallery. Through the work of more than 20 artists, this exhibit provides another evidence of the rich and complex relationships that visual artists have been developping with maps in the recent years. The exhibit is nicely presented in its companion booklet, introduced by a short text written by Katharine Harmon. So it really seems that this is THE place to visit this November, which has been confirmed by Bill Cartwright who had the chance to see it and who was really impressed by its quality.

The Art of Mapping exhibit takes place at the TAG Fine Art gallery in London (14 – 26 November 2011) and also includes some artists talks.

University of Applied Arts Vienna: Mapping the Terminal

Exibition at Vienna Check-in-Terminal, Wien Mitte:

Students of the University of Applied Arts Vienna were working on the complex transit spaces for over 2 years. They turned their attention to the questions: How are you guided and tempted through the terminal? Can we learn something about the structur of our future society through those buildings? What influences has the architeture on the flow of passengers?

The results are presented in the form of drawings, photographies and movies, from 9th of June to 1st of July. 2011 at the Check-in-Terminal of the CAT Terminal, Mitte Wien. (Check-in at Towncentre of Vienna).

Please find more information on the official webpage: dieangewandte.at

mapping the terminal

Journeys beyond the neatline: expanding the boundaries of cartography

There is an intriguing exhibit at University of Alberta Libraries that runs until the end of August 2010: Journeys beyond the neatline: expanding the boundaries of cartography.

This exhibit presents 25 works of two University of Alberta affiliated artist/cartographers who have documented their personal journeys through text and maps. The title of the exhibit — Journeys beyond the neatline — reflects their personal journeys beyond the traditional boundaries of the printed map — the neatline. Both have made pilgrimages which traverse terrain and individual experience. But beyond that, theirs are unique experiences recorded in text and visual expressions as maps. Like the works themselves, this exhibition, exemplifying a growing intersection of art and cartography, also represents a step beyond the traditional map exhibit for the William C. Wonders Map Collection.

I have just received the catalogue of the exhibit. I went through it quickly: It looks like two cartographic travelogues. It is a very nicely designed book and I am looking forward to reading the stories of these two artists/cartographers.