Exhibit

Rethinking Anywhere Anytime

Rethinking Location Anytime Anywhere Everything :: until June 19, 2010 :: Sprüth Magers, Oranienburger Straße 18, D-10178 Berlin.

With works by Rosa BarbaCyprien GaillardAndreas HoferKoo Jeong-ADavid MaljkovicTrevor PaglenChristodoulos PanayiotouSterling RubyPaul SietsemaTaryn SimonArmando Andrade TudelaAndro Wekua. Curated by Johannes Fricke Waldthausen.

Evolving from the work of twelve conceptual artists, filmmakers and photographers presenting alternate interpretations of fictional geographies, imaginary sites and ‘mash-up’ destinations, the exhibition Rethinking Location reconsiders the notion of location. In an era characterized by a rapidly changing perception of time and space due to ever increasing mobility, migration and globalisation, our understanding of what a location is has significantly transformed. Taking these changes for granted, the exhibition investigates how artists consider location and geography as source material for their work.

For more information go to http://turbulence.org/blog/2010/05/17/rethinking-location-anytime-anywhere-everything-berlin/

Magnificent Maps: Power, Propaganda and Art

Fri 30 Apr 2010 – Sun 19 Sep 2010
PACCAR Gallery, British Library

Magnificent Maps showcases the British Library’s unique collection of large-scale display maps, many of which have never been exhibited before, and demonstrates why maps are about far more than geography.

The exhibition will include large-scale, impressive maps from the 1400s to the present day, including the largest atlas in the world, the Klencke Atlas of 1660. It will suggest the settings in which they might originally have been seen – from the palace to the schoolroom and the home – reveal the themes that unite them, and highlight the sheer artistry that was involved in their production.

Magnificent Maps will also explore the reason behind the construction of these visually arresting works of art. Which range from maps used for indoctrination or expressions of local pride to irrefutable statements of power and illustrations of rulers’ spheres of influence.

The exhibition will be supported by a wide range of events, from talks and discussions to family events.

For more information:
Julie Yau, Arts Press Officer, British Library
+44 [0] 20 7412 7237 / julie.yau@bl.uk

The Map Is Not the Territory Revisited (London)

This group exhibition at the England & Co. gallery is the latest in an occasional series of exhibitions of artists using maps and map-making strategies.

Wallis-Johnson_London USA (detail)

Jason Wallis-Johnson: London USA (detail)

Works by artists including: Chris Kenny, Michael Druks, Georgia Russell, Jason Wallis-Johnson, Grayson Perry, 
Rolf Brandt, Cornelia Parker, Terry Ryan, Abigail Reynolds, Jonathan Callan, Deirdre Jackson, Alberto Duman, Vito Drago, Margaret Proudfoot, Richard Wentworth, Jugoslav Vlahovic, Paul Tecklenberg and Satomi Matoba.

7-28 November. Private View Friday 13 November 6 to 8:30 pm
England & Co. Gallery.
216 Westbourne Grove
London
W11 2RH

Thanks to Tinho da Cruz for posting this information via CARTO-SoC, the Society of Cartographers Mailing List.

Hidden histories of exploration

imgAn exhibition devoted to the role of indigenous peoples in the history of exploration can be seen in London these days. There is also a website containing many images, film clips and research materials from the Royal Geographical Society collections: www.rgs.org/hiddenhistories

15 October – 10 December 2009
Location:
Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Exhibition Road, London

Hidden Histories of Exploration reveals the contribution of people such as Juan Tepano, Mohammed Jen Jamain, Sidi Mubarak Bombay, Nain Singh and Pedro Caripoco to the history of exploration. Find out about their role and its lasting significance, as illustrated in the paintings, books, maps photographs, artefacts and manuscripts of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). Materials from Africa, Asia, the Arctic and the Americas are respresented, with highlights including paintings by Thomas Baines, Catherine Frere’s sketches of women on an African expedition, and film from the 1922 Everest expedition.

Aquil Copier

In the context of the exhibition ‘The Importancy of the unimportant’ (20 September – 30 November), at the Hudson Museum (Rotterdam, the Netherlands) we will find the work of the artist Aquil Copier. Oil, airbrush, photoprint and acrylic for painting (should we say mapping!?) landscapes. Enjoy!

Aquil Copier

Oil and airbrush on canvas (diptich). 200x150 cm. 2008

I started my first paintings of aerial views in 2003 when I was travelling very often by airplane between the south of Europe (Italy) and Holland. During my flights I was fascinated by the striking differences between the landscape views from my country and Italy. When you are travelling above Italy you see a very different landscape then in the Netherlands: this is of course because Holland is a flat land, and Italy has a great variety of altitudes (there are alps, mountains, hills, etc). When you see Italy from above, you do not have the perception of clear structures. You rather see plots of streets and countryside -urban and natural landscapes strangely intermingled. (Aquil Copier)

Aquil CopierOil and airbrush on canvas. 30×30 cm. 2008

Newton and Helen Harrison Mapping Conversations

EurAsACentrOfWorld-350x340The exhibition took place a few years ago, but the cartographic examples developed by Newton and Helen Harrison are still inspiring.

“The Harrisons invoke both aspects of mapping, merging one into the other. The map becomes an aesthetic medium, like a painting, in which rivers, mountains, forests, plains, and areas of human habitation converge in abstract patterns that are nonetheless very familiar to us. The detail of line and brushstroke, of color and hue, is no more or less representative than that of any painting, but, as in the landscapes of Vuillard, again, it is representative of the multitudes of nature.”

Experimental Geography: An Aesthetic Investigation of Space

The conference “Experimental Geography: An Aesthetic Investigation of Space” will take place on Saturday, March 21st, 3pm at the New Museum, New York. Sounds really interesting!  Can anybody make it?

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Experimental Geography: An Aesthetic Investigation of Space

Creative Time curator Nato Thompson will lead a discussion of Experimental Geography with Lize Mogel and Damon Rich, two artists who participated in his exhibition (for Independent Curators International) and book (Melville House) of the same name. The discussion will focus on the creative use of landscape hacking, cartography, locative media, and radical urbanism as a means of engaging with the politics of contested spaces. In presenting work from the show and book, the panelists will explore the distinctions between geographical study and artistic experience of the earth, and the juncture where the two realms collide.

More information here.