Speed of Light in Manchester (uk)

Posted previously, the fantastic Speed of Light will be illuminating the night(s) in march at this years Future Everything festival:

Quays Culture presents NVA’s Speed of Light at MediaCityUK, an extraordinary public art performance that is set to bring Salford’s waterfront to life from 8pm on 21, 22 and 23 March. A centrepiece of the Edinburgh International Festival and recently staged in the docklands of Yokohama in Japan, the night-time work uses light, intentional movement and sound to change the way we see and feel about a chosen environment. Hundreds of runners in specially commissioned LED light suits will create beautiful, choreographed patterns of light flowing over bridges and around public spaces and buildings that surround Salford Quays. Free and non-ticketed for the watching audience, it can be seen as a piece of abstract art on the grandest scale: monumental but surprisingly quiet and reflective.

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http://futureeverything.org/summit/art/quays-culture-presents-speed-of-light/

CFP – Special issues on “Narratives and Cartography” in NANO

As described in our previous post we are seeking academic and artistic contributions to be published in two special issues of two academic journals on the relationships between maps and narratives. One will propose a cartographic perspective on the relationships between maps and narratives. It will be published in The Cartographic Journal and co-edited by Sébastien Caquard and William Cartwright (for more details see the call for papers).

The other one will focus on the artistic points of view of the relationships between narratives and cartography. It will be published in NANO – New American Notes Online (issue 6) and co-edited by Laurene Vaughan and Matthew Bissen.  NANO is a peer-reviewed online journal capable of publishing a full range of media and designed to encourage new interpretations and new possibilities. We are particularly interested in submissions that explore and articulate representations of place via narrative structures, especially the different ways such places and structures are recorded, communicated, and critiqued.  We invite submissions that address forms of these two broad questions:  how do narratives traverse through a “somewhere”?  And, equally important, how are real and imagined places narrated?  Acceptable formats, sizes and lengths are listed below.

Schedule:
Deadlines concerning the special issue to be published in NANO:
– Jan. 28th, 2013: Call for papers
– Jun. 28th, 2013: Deadline to submit full papers & works to Laurene Vaughan (laurene.vaughan@rmit.edu.au) and Matthew Bissen (mdbissen@gmail.com)
– Aug. 30th, 2013: Comments sent by the editors to the authors
– Oct. 18th, 2013: Final version of the papers & works submitted by the authors to NANO for the review process (For the detailed instructions to the authors, please look at the web site of NANO: http://www.nanocrit.com/~nanocrit/submissions-information/)
– Nov. 15th, 2013: End of the review process
– Jan. 31st, 2014: Final versions of the selected papers sent by the authors to NANO
– May 2014: Publication of the special issue in NANO

(This will coincide with the publication of work in the parallel issue on Cartographies and Narrative in The Cartographic Journal)

Submission Guidelines:
Format Guidelines concerning the special issue to be published in NANO:
Papers with images –3,500 words maximum; 15 images maximum in high resolution—JPEG format preferred
Film Shorts –5-10 minutes maximum using .mov, .mp4, or .wmv formats
(min res = 426 x 400, max res 1920 x 1080)
Sound Essays – 10 minutes maximum using .mp3 encoding at bitrates above 256 kbit/s (preferred)
Electronic submission preferred. Text submissions should be sent as an email attachment using MS Word (doc.) or Rich Text Format (.rtf). Refer to the list above for multimedia submissions. Do not include your name on the attached document, but do include your name and the title of your note in the body of your email. All manuscripts should follow MLA guidelines for format, in-text citations, and works cited.  Please send any questions that you have to Laurene Vaughan (laurene.vaughan@rmit.edu.au) and Matthew Bissen (mdbissen@gmail.com).

Copyright and Permissions:
NANO expects that all submissions contain original work, not extracts or abridgements. Authors may use their NANO material in other publications provided that NANO is acknowledged as the original publisher. Authors are responsible for obtaining permission for reproducing copyright text, art, video, or other media. As an academic, peer-reviewed journal, whose mission is education, Fair Use rules of copyright apply to NANO. Send questions to the editor.

We would appreciate it if you could inform us in February if you plan to submit a paper or work to one of these special issues.

Please feel free to contact Sébastien Caquard or William Cartwright concerning The Cartographic Journal, and Laurene Vaughan and Matthew Bissen concerning NANO.

Call for papers – Special issues on “Cartography and Narratives”

Building upon the extensive work on literary geography, and on cartographic cinema, a range of scholars in the humanities have endorsed mapping as a conceptual framework to improve our understating of narratives. Meanwhile, geographers and cartographers have recognized the importance of mapping personal stories and vernacular knowledge in order to better understand their contribution to the production of places. Examples of this fusion between maps and narratives range from GPS drawing, to walking as a way of addressing the performative nature of mapping, and from the political mapping of journeys and stories of illegal migrants crossing borders, to the mapping of very personal feelings and emotions.

In order to further explore these relationships between maps and narratives, the commission on Art and Cartography of the International Cartographic Association (ICA) has organized a workshop on this thematic in Zurich in June 2012 . We are now seeking academic and artistic contributions to be published in two special issues of two academic journals.

One will be published in The Cartographic Journal and co-edited by Sébastien Caquard and William Cartwright. It will compile a range of academic papers providing more of a cartographic perspective on the relationships between maps and narratives. The second one will focus on the artistic points of view of the relationships between cartography and narratives. This second special issue will be co-edited by Laurene Vaughan and Matthew Bissen and it will be published in a multi-media focused journal (more details about this publication available soon). Both of these issues will be cross-referenced to give more visibility to the publications as well as to support the interdisciplinary dimension of this project.

Here are the main deadlines concerning the special issue to be published in The Cartographic Journal:

– Dec. 19th, 2012 – Call for papers

– April 30th, 2013 – Deadline to submit full papers (4,000 – 5,000 words) to Sébastien Caquard (sebastien.caquard@concordia.ca) and William Cartwright (w.cartwright@rmit.edu.au)

– May 31st, 2013 – Comments sent by the editors to the authors

June 30th, 2013 – Final version of the papers submitted by the authors to The Cartographic Journal website for the review process (For the detailed instructions to authors, please look at the web site of The Cartographic Journal)

– Aug 31st, 2013 – End of the review process

Dec. 31st, 2013 – Final versions of the selected papers sent by the authors to The Cartographic Journal

– May 2014 – Publication of the special issue in The Cartographic Journal

Speed of Light

Happy New Year everyone.

 

A mesmerising visual display unfolds each night on the ascent to the summit as hundreds of runners wearing specially designed light suits take to the intricate path networks below. As a member of the walking audience you become part of the work, carrying portable light sources set against the dark features of the hill.

Each individual performance is created by collective action, landscape and weather, offering a rare perspective on the cityscape, night skies and the sea and hills beyond.

speed of lightspeed of light2

http://edinburghfestival.list.co.uk/event/246791-nvas-speed-of-light/

The Sound of the earth

A very impressive ‘Sound Globus’ was developed by Yuri Suzuki, sound artist. He is mapping sound – pieces of typical music found on those places – on a ‘3D globus disk': Sound of the Earth Project

The Sound of the Earth is a content of Yuri Suzuki`s spherical record project, the grooves representing
the outlines of the geographic land mass. Each country on the disc is engraved with a different sound, as the needle passes over it plays field recordings collected by Yuri Suzuki from around the world over the course of four years; traditional folk music, national anthems, popular music and spoken word broadcasts.
An aural journey around the world in 30 minutes.

International Cartographic Conference 2013 – Deadline for submitting abstracts: Nov. 1st

Please remember that the deadline for submitting papers and abstracts for the 2013 International Cartographic Conference in Dresden (Germany) is November 1st (very soon…). During this conference, the art & cartography commission aims to organize several paper sessions, as well as different art related activities such as the screening of a movie on cartography and narrative (the movie is currently under production). We hope to meet a broad range of people interested in the relationships between art, culture and cartography.

Wastelands to Wonderlands

I recently visited the British Library @britishlibrary in London where they explored literature ‘from William Blake to the 21st-century suburban hinterlands of J G Ballard, Writing Britain examines how the landscapes of Britain permeate great literary works.’

It is an interesting project with over 150 literary works included categorised into:

  1. Rural Dreams
  2. Dark Satanic Mills
  3. Wild Places
  4. Beyond the City
  5. Cockney Visions
  6. Waterlands

What caught my attention was the description of Wild Places,

‘Wild landscapes such as moors and heaths can be overwhelming and unknowable, presenting challenges to the human mind. […] Encounters with the wild can equally be transformative for writers, enlarging their ordinary limits of perception, and prompting spiritual renewal’

It was enlarging the ordinary limits of perception that intrigued me, is this what neocartography could be, what makes these places enlarge the ordinary limits of perception?

I like to think that it is something along the lines of ‘GeoSensitivities’ that these places are transformed/transcend the ordinary limits through literature or cartography. These sensitivities could be along the lines of what psychogeography explores:

  • human beings walking (not cars)
  • lost found making the unimaginable, imaginable
  • new maps can smell
  • experiential & hidden

These are some of the views that @FelphamPA proposes, is it partly that place of magical realism in literature, these non existent environments (enhancements) that enlarge the ordinary limits of perception?

It could be these devices literature/geosensitivities that could provide the wonder, or as FelphamPA quotes:

“Felpham, in particular, is the sweetest spot on earth.”
William Blake

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/writingbritain/about/

Share your own tales with an interactive map http://www.bl.uk/pin-a-tale/pin-a-tale-map.aspx

You might also like http://www.poetryatlas.com/